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Salmon With Coriander Rub and Lime Cream

In seafood On June 17, 2010 3 Comments

Salmon With Coriander Rub and Lime Cream (recipe by Bon Appetit, June 2010)

I enjoyed the coriander rub on the salmon, but not the lime cream. I served it with Green Beans and Zucchini With Sauce Verte, which tasted even better after the flavors had a chance to develop in the refrigerator overnight.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Porchetta-Style Roast Pork

In comfort food, pork On June 16, 2010 6 Comments

Porchetta-Style Roast Pork (recipe by Bon Appetit, June 2010)

Pork shoulder is one of those chefs’ secret cuts of meat that is inexpensive and tastes delicious. Even when it’s not on sale, it’s only about $2.00/pound at my grocery store.

With little effort the roast pork came out of the oven looking beautiful, and it worked well as both a main dish and for pulled pork sandwiches. I made it a second time with a bone-in roast in a roasting pan and that worked great too. It fell rights off the bone when I started cutting it.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons fennel seeds
  • 1 tablespoon coarse kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
  • 1 5 1/2- to 6-pound boneless pork shoulder (Boston butt), excess fat trimmed with thin layer left intact
  • 6 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus additional for brushing
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 cup low-salt chicken broth

Preparation

Stir fennel seeds in small skillet over medium-high heat until slightly darker in color and fragrant, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer seeds to spice mill and cool. Add kosher salt, peppercorns, and dried crushed red pepper. Grind to medium-fine consistency (not powder).

Place pork in 13 x 9 x 2-inch glass baking dish. Rub garlic all over pork, then coat with spice mixture. Loosely cover pork with waxed paper. Refrigerate overnight.

Preheat oven to 450°F. Brush large rimmed baking sheet with oil. Place roast, fat side up and coating intact, in center of sheet. Drizzle evenly with 2 tablespoons oil. Roast pork 30 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 300°F. Roast pork until very tender and thermometer inserted into center of pork registers 190°F, about 3 hours 15 minutes longer. Transfer pork to cutting board; reserve baking sheet. Let pork rest 15 to 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, pour all pan juices into 2-cup measuring cup. Spoon off fat that rises to top. Place reserved baking sheet across 2 burners. Pour wine and broth onto baking sheet and bring to boil over medium-high heat, scraping up any browned bits. Boil until wine mixture is reduced to 3/4 cup, about 4 minutes. Add degreased pan juices and whisk to blend. Pour pan sauce into small bowl (sauce will be thin).

Thinly slice roast. Serve with sauce.

Serving Idea

Serve it with Jim ‘N Nick’s Coleslaw.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Green Beans and Zucchini With Sauce Verte

In seasonal, side dish, vegetarian On June 16, 2010 4 Comments

 

Green Beans and Zucchini With Sauce Verte (recipe by Bon Appetit, June 2010)

It was a “gold star” food photography day. I pretended I was a food paparazzo clammering for the glam shot and I got it! Thanks to David who expertly positioned the serving spoon.

I’m having a lot of fun with Bon Appetit’s June 2010 issue because they dreamed up all of these mix and match combinations for main and side dishes. Today I tried Green Beans and Zucchini With Sauce Verte which I am going to pair with Salmon With Coriander Rub and Lime Cream tomorrow.

With a tablespoon of capers in the sauce, the green beans and zucchini was rather salty. I doubt if this side is going to make the Bon Appetit Hall of Fame. It will probably work with the salmon though. You could also serve it with Porchetta-Style Roast Pork.

The recipe calls for fresh basil and parsley. Here’s an idea to use up your leftover parsley: Rib-eye Steaks With Chimichurri

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Asian Chicken-Noodle Salad With Snap Peas

In asian, Japanese, poultry, seasonal On June 13, 2010 0 Comments

Asian Chicken-Noodle Salad With Snap Peas (recipe by Bon Appetit, June 2010)

The mango-sesame dressing in this summery noodle salad is delicious, and it has definitely piqued my interest for other uses. I’m happy to have the recipe in my repertoire. I did have trouble at the grocery store locating the key ingredient, Major Grey’s mango chutney. I was in the correct aisle, but it was located near the ketchup and ham glazes–who knew? The dressing recipe calls for 3/4 cup of chutney, which is precisely one 9 ounce bottle. Some other reviewers thought the dressing is “so good you can drink it”–it really is!

I opted to pan fry the chicken rather than grill it, which worked out quite well. I think less sugar snap peas and more udon would be better.

More ideas for recipes with mango flavor: Mango Chicken Stir Fry With Snap Peas

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Israeli Couscous With Asparagus, Peas, and Sugar Snaps

In Middle Eastern, seasonal On June 10, 2010 5 Comments

Israeli Couscous With Asparagus, Peas, and Sugar Snaps (recipe by Bon Appetit, June 2010)

I made a special trip to my neighborhood Middle Eastern grocery store for the Israeli couscous and I’m sure glad I did. I had thought about substituting regular couscous not realizing the texture would be so different. It reminded me of tiny croutons on a salad– crusty little bits that soak up some of the dressing. In any event this side dish has it all. In addition to the  wonderful texture, it has beautiful color, a zesty dressing, and seasonal ingredients. I paired it with Sauteed Chicken Paillards With Artichoke Hearts.


Starting today I’m going to attempt to photograph all of my dishes, even though food photography is not my forte. I’ll try to learn as much as I can and at some point in the future I’ll likely look back with a bit of embarassment. I found a photography blog to guide me along this new journey The Digital Photgraphy School. Maybe somebody will be kind enough to offer me some food styling and photography pointers.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Lime Tart With Blackberries and Blueberries

In desserts, seasonal On June 7, 2010 2 Comments

Lime Tart With Blackberries and Blueberries (photo and recipe by Bon Appetit, June 2010)

This was the most perfect looking dessert I ever made. I say that in part because I’m not a great decorator, and desserts often need an artistic touch to look as well as they taste. I wish I had taken a picture because for once my version looked just like Bon Appetit’s. Unlike some other tarts I have made in the past, the flavor was nicely balanced. The custard is not too overbearingly sweet or sour, and it is offset perfectly by the unadultered fresh berries and buttery crust. Next time I’m going to try the crust and lime curd with fresh strawberries from the farmers’ market!

I did have one problem with this recipe though. The time it took to thicken the curd was definitely not 6 minutes. My arm was ready to fall offf. It was more like a half hour and the temperature never did reach 180 degrees. I even checked my thermometer afterwards to see if it was broken and it was fine. I’m not sure what happened. I noticed others who made the recipe had similar comments.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Michael’s Fresh Squeezed Lemonade

In drinks, seasonal On June 7, 2010 0 Comments

Michael’s Fresh Squeezed Lemonade

Fresh squeezed lemonade is one of my favorite summertime treats. It’s so easy to make that you really don’t need a recipe. Get a bag of lemons–10 or so. I find that using a vintage style reamer (pictured below) is the easiest way to juice them. My rule of thumb is to mix equal parts lemon juice to sugar, and add water and ice. Keep in mind that the ice will dilute the lemonade a bit..

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fresh lemon juice
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 6 cups water
  • ice

Preparation

Mix lemon juice and sugar together. The sugar will dissolve somewhat. Add the juice to a pitcher with water and stir well. Add ice.

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Rib-eye Steaks With Chimichurri

In beef, seasonal On June 3, 2010 3 Comments

Rib-eye Steaks With Chimichurri (recipe by Chicago Tribune)

Chimichurri (recipe by Chicago Tribune)

I was so thrilled to see this recipe for chimichurri in the Chicago Tribune because I have a huge perennial oregano plant growing in my garden, and the sauce calls for a whole cup of it. Last summer I was planning on making steaks with chimichurri for a dinner party, but two grocery stores I went to were out of parsley. I was so frustrated. The homemade chimichurri was to be the star of the meal. Last minute I resorted to using my friend’s jarred sauce, which she magically produced from her refrigerator. I subsequently misplaced the recipe, so this is my second attempt. I guess I don’t give up easily! I’m glad because it was delicious.

I served the rib-eye steaks and chimichurri with Martha Stewart’s All-American Potato Salad. I’m looking forward to retrying this recipe with fresh garlic from my garden later this summer.

follow-up: I retried the recipe substituting cilantro for the parsley and liked it even better. Not sure if that would still be considered a chimichurri sauce though!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 tablespoon salt
  • 1 head garlic, separated into cloves, minced
  • 1 cup packed fresh flat-leaf parsley, minced
  • 1 cup fresh oregano leaves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Preparation

Heat the water to a boil in a small saucepan. Add the salt, stir until dissolved. Remove from heat; cool. Combine garlic, parsley, oregano and red pepper flakes in a medium bowl. Whisk in the red wine vinegar; whisk in the olive oil. Whisk in the salted water. Transfer to a jar with a tight-fitting lid, refrigerate.

Another Idea

Need to use up some cilantro? Try salsa verde. Also, check out my top 9 recipes that use fresh herbs.

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Michael’s Crazy Noodles with Ground Chicken

In asian, poultry, Thai On May 28, 2010 12 Comments

Crazy Chicken Rice Noodle Stir-Fry 014

Michael’s Crazy Noodles with Ground Chicken (recipe by “Oishii!”)

This recipe is inspired by Ming Tsai’s “My Crazy Chicken-Rice Noodle Stir-Fry,” which appears in his cookbook “Simply Ming.” He calls them crazy because the “spiciness leaves you goofy with delight.” I call them crazy because my David is crazy for them. He requests this dish more than any other, which makes it a household staple.

Ingredients

  • 14 ounce pack fresh rice stick noodles (banh pho tsui, e.g. Golden Boy brand)
  • 3 tablespoons fish sauce (e.g. Squid brand)
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice, plus slices for garnish
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 tablespoon Sriracha brand hot chile sauce, or to taste
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 large onion, diced
  • 2 large cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 pound or more ground chicken or turkey
  • 2 large scallions, sliced
  • 1/3 packed cup (1/2 ounce) chopped Thai basil, plus more for garnish
  • kosher salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

Fill a large bowl with warm water. Add the noodles and soak until tender, about half an hour. Drain and set aside.

In a small bowl combine the fish sauce, lime juice, sugar, and chili sauce, and stir until the sugar is dissolved.

Heat a wok over high heat until almost smoking. Add the oil and swirl to coat the pan. Add the onions and garlic, and cook until the onions soften. Add the ground chicken and brown. Add the noodles and the sauce mixture, and heat through. Add the scallions and basil, and toss well. Season with kosher salt and pepper. Garnish with some fresh basil and lime slices if desired.

Other Thai Favorites

Pad Siew
Authentic Shrimp Pad Thai
Thai Style Wide Noodles in Gravy (Lard Nar)

Ideas

Here’s another recipe that uses Thai basil: Thai Curried Noodles With Pork and Basil. Also check out my top 9 recipes that use fresh herbs.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I develop in my test kitchen. My inspiration comes from cooking magazines (Bon Appétit, Fine Cooking, Food & Wine), cookbooks, blogs, online food communities such as Chowhound.com, popular restaurants, tv shows, friends, and family.

Now it’s your turn. Do you have a favorite Asian noodle dish? We would love to hear from you if you enjoyed this recipe. -Michael

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Michael’s Bosc Pear, Blue Cheese, and Pistachio Salad With Balsamic Vinaigrette

In lunch, salad, vegetarian On May 26, 2010 2 Comments

Bosc Pear, Blue Cheese, and Pistachio Salad 001

Michael’s Bosc Pear, Blue Cheese, and Pistachio Salad With Balsamic Vinaigrette (recipe by “Oishii!”)

I often make this luscious salad for lunch. I’m a fan of bold balsamic vinaigrettes so my dressing contains a higher than normal ratio of vinegar to olive oil. The dijon mustard binds the ingredients and the sugar balances out the flavor. There will be enough dressing for 3-4 salads.  Try adding homemade croutons.

Ingredients

vinaigrette:

  • 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • kosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

salad:
one serving

  • 4 ounces red or green leaf lettuce, chopped
  • 1/2 bosc or anjou pear (1/3 cup or 2 oz) peeled, cored, and chopped
  • 1 ounce blue cheese (1/4 small pack of Rosenborg Castello Danish or other brand)
  • 1/4 cup cranberries
  • 1/3 cup roasted salted shelled pistachios

Preparation

To make the vinaigrette, in a small bowl whisk together the vinegar, olive oil, dijon mustard, sugar, salt, and pepper.

Add lettuce to large bowl and drizzle vinaigrette on it to taste and toss. Add pears, blue cheese, and cranberries. Lightly toss salad again and top with pistachios.

Prep Tip

Dry the cleaned lettuce in a salad spinner. Keep it fresh for even hours before serving by wrapping it up in a flour sack towel and refrigerate.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

Now it’s your turn. How do you make your salads interesting? How do you like to eat blue cheese, pears, or pistachios? If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Please leave some feedback in the comments section below. -Michael

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