Latest

Roasted Red Pepper Hummus

In appetizer, healthy, Middle Eastern, snack, vegetarian On October 24, 2010 17 Comments

Roasted Red Pepper Hummus 023

Roasted Red Pepper Hummus (recipe by “Oishii!”)

I love dips of all types. Here’s one that’s guilt free. Serve it with red pepper strips, carrot sticks, cucumber slices, or pita chips for a healthy snack or appetizer. It would be a great addition to a kid’s lunch box too.

Ingredients

  • 1 can garbanzo beans (drained and rinsed)
  • 2/3 cup roasted red peppers from a jar, drained
  • 2 large cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1/3 cup tahini
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/2 cup olive oil, or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon warm water
  • kosher salt
  • optional garnishes: fresh parsley, paprika, tomatoes, cucumbers, olives, etc.

Preparation

Add to food processor garbanzo beans, roasted red peppers, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, water, and kosher salt. Process all ingredients. Adjust olive oil to taste. Put in serving bowl and sprinkle extra extra olive oil on top if you wish. Optional: Garnish with fresh parsley, paprika, tomatoes, cucumbers, olives, etc.

Ideas

Great with falafel sandwiches. For a similar recipe, try Mary’s Hummus with Toasted Pita Chips or Mary’s Baba Ghanoush with Toasted Pita Chips.  If you like the flavor of tahini, Jersusalam Salad is nice too.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook

Bulgur, Garbanzo Bean, and Cucumber Salad

In healthy, salad, vegetarian On October 23, 2010 8 Comments

Bulgur, Garbanzo Bean, and Cucumber Salad 002

Bulgur, Garbanzo Bean, and Cucumber Salad (recipe by Bon Appétit, October 2010)

Healthy eating can be as easy as cooking some bulgur wheat, mixing a simple dressing, and adding a few fresh ingredients and a couple of items from the pantry. This light salad is something you would expect to find behind a gourmet deli counter.  It would be a perfect vegetarian main dish, or as an accompaniment to a baked fish or my roasted chicken salad with dried cherries and peanuts. Hothouse cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, and dill are available all year long in the produce section at supermarkets, so this is a nice idea for any season.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups whole grain quick-cooking bulgur (11 to 12 ounces)
  • 2 15- to 16-ounce cans garbanzo beans (chickpeas), drained
  • 2 1/2-pint containers small red and/or yellow cherry tomatoes
  • 1 cup diced unpeeled English hothouse cucumber
  • 1 cup diced roasted red peppers from jar
  • 2/3 cup (packed) chopped fresh dill
  • 1/4 cup white balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 6 tablespoons olive oil

Ingredients note: Bulgur wheat can be found in natural food stores, Middle Eastern specialty grocers, and some traditional grocery stores. Look for jarred roasted red peppers in the Italian section of grocery stores.

Preparation

Cook bulgur in large saucepan of boiling salted water until just tender, 10 to 12 minutes. Drain. Rinse with cold water to cool; drain well. Transfer to large bowl. Add garbanzos and next 4 ingredients.

Whisk vinegar and cumin in small bowl. Whisk in oil. Season dressing with salt and pepper; pour over bulgur to coat salad. Season with salt and pepper

Other Ideas: Leftover dill? Try Danish Egg Salad and also check out my top 9 recipes that use fresh herbs. Here’s another recipe that uses bulgur wheat: Moroccan-style Stuffed Acorn Squashes.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook

lard nar

Lard Nar (Thai Style Wide Noodles in Gravy)

In asian, Thai On October 17, 2010 13 Comments

Lard Nar 013

Lard Nar (Thai Style Wide Noodles in Gravy) (recipe adapted from ImportFood.com)

A kind person on Chowhound.com recommended ImportFood.com, which has a collection of authentic Thai recipes and videos to accompany groceries they sell. Their lard nar tastes as good as any I have ever had in a Thai restaurant. Be sure to use a non-stick frying pan or wok as indicated, or you will end up with a sticky mess to clean up.

Ingredients

  • 10 ounces wide rice noodles (dried) or 16 ounces fresh wide rice noodles
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon black soy sauce (also called dark sweet soy sauce, e.g. Kwong Hung Seng Sauce)
  • 1/2 lb. chicken breast, cut into thin slices
  • 3 tablespoons tapioca starch, divided
  • 1 tablespoon Maggi Seasoning
  • 3 cups chicken stock, divided
  • 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon yellow bean paste (also called soybean paste, e.g. Healthy Boy brand)
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce (e.g. Kikkoman brand)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 cups broccoli (or gailan), about 5 ounces, cut into small bite-sized pieces
  • freshly ground pepper

Preparation

If using dried noodles, soak in a large bowl of warm water for 30 minutes.  Rinse in cold water and drain well.  If using fresh noodles, separate them with your fingers in a large bowl. Toss noodles with one tablespoon of oil and black soy sauce.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl mix chicken with one tablespoon tapioca starch and Maggi seasoning. Marinate for 10 minutes.

In another small bowl combine 1/2 cup chicken stock with remaining 2 tablespoons tapioca starch, and set aside.

Heat a 12″ non-stick frying pan or large non-stick wok over high heat. Add another tablespoon of oil to pan until almost smoking hot, and stir fry noodles until golden brown. Return noodles to the large bowl.

Heat same frying pan to medium high and add one tablespoon of oil. Add chicken mixture and garlic, and fry until chicken is golden brown color. Mix in yellow soybean paste. Add remaining
2 1/2 cups chicken stock. When stock starts to boil, add fish sauce, oyster sauce and sugar. Let it cook a few minutes. Mix in tapioca chicken stock mixture. Add broccoli and cook until crisp tender and the “gravy” thickens. (Do not overcook the broccoli!)

Pour the broccoli and chicken with gravy over the noodles. Sprinkle with freshly ground pepper to taste.

Other Thai Favorites

Michael’s Crazy Chicken Rice Noodle Stir Fry
Pad Siew
Authentic Shrimp Pad Thai

Lard na

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

Now it’s your turn. Do you have any great recipes which use wide noodles? If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Please leave some feedback in the comments section below. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook

Classic Caramel Apples

In autumn, candy, desserts, seasonal, snack, vegetarian On October 10, 2010 17 Comments

Caramel Apples 008

Classic Caramel Apples (recipe adapted from Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Inc.)

Candy making is pure magic when it goes well, and these caramel apples are so much fun to make. The homemade caramel is a beautiful, golden brown color with a soft, smooth texture, and a little taste of butter. It sticks well to the apples too. I noticed quite a few recipes out there that call for melting down individually packaged squares of caramels–not this one! It’s the real deal.

It  seems that in recent years those make-at-home caramel apple kits with the perfect sheets of caramel have all but disappeared from grocery store shelves. That’s OK because this is my new standard.  You will need a candy thermometer. If you don’t have one, it is worth going out and purchasing one at a kitchen store.

Wooden sticks for caramel apples: Martha Stewart uses wooden craft sticks for caramel apples. I’m going to look for those for my next batch. I made due with 4 1/2″ bamboo skewers. Asian grocery stores stock them for satays, and they are extremely  cheap–about a half dollar for a pack of hundred of them.

Ingredients

  • 6 wooden craft sticks
  • 6 medium apples, any variety, stems removed
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup dark corn syrup
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter

Preparation

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, and grease with butter.

Wash and thoroughly dry apples. Insert sticks into tops of them.

Prepare an ice-water bath.

Clip a candy thermometer to a large heavy saucepan. Over medium-high heat bring cream, sugar, corn syrup, and butter to a boil in saucepan. Continue to cook until mixture reaches 245 degrees, 10 to 12 minutes.

Place pan in ice-water bath to stop the cooking. Dip bottom of each apple in caramel. Using a spoon, coat apples. Transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet, and refrigerate until set, about 15 minutes (or overnight). Recipe adapted from Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Inc.)

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

Now it’s your turn. What are your favorite caramel recipes? I’ve seen some tempting caramel corns, popcorn balls, and caramel cakes out there. If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Please leave your feedback in the comments section below. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook

shrimp pad thai

Authentic Shrimp Pad Thai

In asian, favorite, Thai On October 9, 2010 16 Comments

Shrimp Pad Thai 005

Authentic Shrimp Pad Thai (recipe adapted from Kasma Loha-unchit)

Despite our love of Thai food here in the U.S. there is a curious lack of information about its ingredients and preparation. I think that this in part stems from our fear of the unknown. Indeed, shopping in an Asian grocery store can feel like being in a foreign country. However, if you locate a friendly grocery store and ask for some help in finding the ingredients, you’ll be well on your way.

I’ve been waiting for some time now to “come across” an authentic pad thai recipe. I think I have finally found my definitive source in Kasma Loha-unchit, a Thai native and cooking teacher. Despite a laundry list of unfamiliar ingredients, pad thai isn’t as daunting to make as it appears. After all, it’s a simple stir-fried noodle dish that is common “street food” in Thailand.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb. dried or 1 lb. fresh thin rice noodles (gkuay dtiow or ban pho in Vietnamese)
  • 3 tablespoons fish sauce (nahm bplah)
  • 3 tablespoons tamarind concentrate
  • 2 tablespoons palm or coconut sugar
  • 4 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 1/3 lb. fresh shrimp, shelled, deveined and butterflied
  • 3/4 cup firm pressed tofu, cut into thin strips about an inch long, half an inch wide and a quarter inch thick
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 3 shallots, thinly sliced (or substitute half a medium sized onion)
  • 1/4 cup small dried shrimp
  • 1/4 cup chopped sweetened salted radish
  • 1-2 teaspoons ground dried red chilies
  • 3 eggs, scrambled
  • 1 1/2 cups fresh bean sprouts, and more to garnish
  • 1 cup garlic chives, cut into 1 1/2-inch-long pieces
  • 2/3 cup chopped unsalted roasted peanuts
  • 4 green onions, sliced (optional)
  • cilantro, a few sprigs
  • 1 lime, cut into small wedges

Preparation

Soak the rice noodles in cool or lukewarm water until the noodles are limp but still firm to the touch. Dry noodles will take much longer than fresh, from 40 minutes to an hour. When the noodles have softened, drain and set aside.

Make the sauce while the noodles are soaking. Combine fish sauce, tamarind, and palm sugar in a small bowl. Stir well until the sugar dissolves. Adjust flavors to desired taste of salty, sour, and sweet, and set aside.

Heat a large wok over high heat until it is smoking hot. Add 2 teaspoons of oil and quickly stir fry the shrimp until it turn pink and is almost cooked through. Sprinkle lightly with some fish sauce and remove from the wok.

Swirl in 3 tablespoons of peanut oil to coat the wok surface and wait 20 to 30 seconds for it to heat. Add the tofu, frying 1 to 2 minutes until golden. Add garlic and stir fry with the tofu for 15 to 20 seconds. Follow with the sliced shallots and cook another 15 seconds. Then add the dried shrimp, sweetened salted radish, and ground dried chillies. Stir and heat through a few seconds.

Add the noodles and toss well with the ingredients in the wok. Stir fry 1 to 2 minutes, and when most of the noodles have changed texture and softened, push them to one side of the wok. Add the remaining teaspoon of oil to the cleared area and add eggs. When the eggs have set, cut into small chunks with the spatula and toss them in with the noodles.

Add the sauce. Stir well to evenly coat noodles. If the noodles are still too firm, add 1 to 2 tablespoons of water over them to help cook. Adjust flavors by adding more fish sauce or tamarind juice; if the noodles are not sweet enough, sprinkle in a small amount of granulated sugar. Toss in bean sprouts and the garlic chives. Sprinkle with half the chopped peanuts and return the shrimp to the wok. Stir until the garlic chives are partially wilted.

Transfer to a serving platter or onto individual sized serving plates. Garnish with the remaining bean sprouts, chopped peanuts, green onions, cilantro, and lime wedges. Squeeze lime juice over each portion before eating.

Serves 4 as a one dish lunch. Adapted from Kasma Loha-unchit.

Other Thai Favorites

Michael’s Crazy Chicken Rice Noodle Stir Fry
Pad Siew
Lard Nar (Thai Style Wide Noodles in Gravy)

What are your favorites?

Pad Thai

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook

Rigatoni with Shrimp, Calamari, and Basil

In pasta, seafood On October 3, 2010 5 Comments

Rigatoni with Shrimp, Calamari, and Basil 002

Rigatoni with Shrimp, Calamari, and Basil (recipe by Bon Appétit, September 2010)

Chocked full of plenty of shrimp and calamari, this light rigatoni dish comes from new restaurant Marea in New York (“The 10 Best New Restaurants in America,” Bon Appétit, September 2010). Seafood lovers will love the clean, simple flavors.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound uncooked large shrimp, peeled, deveined, divided
  • 14 ounces cleaned calamari (bodies only; tentacles reserved for another use), divided
  • 12 ounces rigatoni pasta
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 3 cups thinly sliced leeks (white and pale green parts only; about 3 large)
  • 3 large garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
  • 1 8-ounce bottle clam juice
  • 1/3 cup frozen peas, thawed
  • 4 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 1/2 cup finely grated Pecorino Romano cheese or Parmesan cheese plus additional (for serving)
  • 3/4 cup thinly sliced fresh basil, divided

Preparation

Place half of shrimp in medium bowl. Slice half of calamari crosswise into 1/3-inch-wide rings and place in small bowl.

Coarsely chop remaining shrimp and calamari; place in processor. Using on/off turns, blend until shrimp mixture is finely chopped. Transfer to another medium bowl.

Cook pasta in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, heat 5 tablespoons oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add leeks, garlic, and crushed red pepper; sauté until leeks are tender but not brown, about 5 minutes. Add chopped shrimp mixture; stir until shrimp and calamari are just opaque, about 2 minutes. Add clam juice and peas; simmer until flavors blend, about 3 minutes. Stir in 3 tablespoons butter. Season with salt and pepper. Set sauce aside; cover to keep warm.

Melt remaining 1 tablespoon butter with 1 tablespoon oil in medium nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add reserved whole shrimp and sauté 2 minutes. Add calamari rings to shrimp; sprinkle with salt and pepper and sauté until just opaque, about 2 minutes longer. Remove from heat.

Drain pasta; return to same pot. Add chopped shrimp and calamari sauce, 1/2 cup cheese, and 1/2 cup basil and toss to blend.

Divide pasta among 4 bowls. Top each serving with sautéed shrimp mixture; sprinkle with remaining 1/4 cup basil. Pass additional cheese separately and serve.

Calamari sourcing and prep notes: Surprisingly, my grocery store Jewel in Chicago does not sell calamari. However, I found a one pound bag of prepared, frozen squid rings at my local Asian supermarket, which I thought was really convenient. I simply sliced some of the thicker rings in half to get as close to 1/3″ wide as possible. Make sure calamari (and shrimp) is completely dry or else it will steam rather than fry. I wrap it up in a flour sack towel and squeeze out the moisture.

Basil lover?  Check out my top 9 recipes that use fresh herbs.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook

French Lentil and Kielbasa Soup

In comfort food, lunch, soup On September 29, 2010 0 Comments

Lentil Sausage Soup 024

French Lentil and Kielbasa Soup (recipe adapted from Ina Garten, “Barefoot in Paris,” 2004)

French Lentil and Kielbasa soup is hearty enough to be a satisfying meal. Round it off with some crusty bread and a glass of red wine, and you are all set.

Soup making is forgiving, and not an exact science, so trust your taste buds and make adjustments with the seasonings as the flavors slowly come together.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound French green lentils
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 cups diced yellow onions
  • 2 leeks (white and light green parts only)
  • 2 large cloves garlic, chopped
  • kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme (or 1 tablespoon fresh thyme)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 3 cups medium diced celery
  • 3 cups medium diced carrots
  • 12 cups chicken broth (equals 3 quarts)
  • 1  6-ounce can tomato paste
  • 1 pound kielbasa, cut into 1/2″ pieces
  • 3/4 cup dry red wine (e.g. Merlot)
  • Freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Preparation

Add lentils to a large mixing bowl. Boil some water in large saucepan. Pour boiling water on top of the lentils, and cover. Drain after 15 minutes and set aside.

Heat the olive oil in a large soup kettle over medium heat. Add the onions, leeks, and garlic, and cook until the vegetables soften. Season with kosher salt, freshly ground pepper, thyme, and cumin. Mix in the celery and carrots and continue cooking for another 10 minutes. Add the chicken broth, tomato paste, and lentils. Cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer uncovered for 1 hour, or until the lentils are tender. Add the kielbasa and red wine and simmer, and cook a few more minutes until the kielbasa is cooked through. Serve with freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I develop in my test kitchen. My inspiration comes from cooking magazines (Bon Appétit, Fine Cooking, Food & Wine), cookbooks, blogs, online food communities such as Chowhound.com, popular restaurants, tv shows, friends, and family.

Now it’s your turn. Do you have any soups that you consider to be comfort foods? If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook

Rigatoni with Braised Chicken and Saffron Cream

In favorite, pasta, poultry On September 24, 2010 20 Comments

Rigatoni with Braised Chicken and Saffron Cream 014

Rigatoni with Braised Chicken and Saffron Cream (recipe by Bon Appétit, September 2010)

The official start of autumn has really got me in the mood for comfort foods, and pasta is high up on the list. This easy to make and simply unforgettable rigatoni appears in a great article in Bon Appétit this month titled “The 10 Best New Restaurants in America,” and comes from Bar La Grassa in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Ingredients
  • 2 1/2 to 2 3/4 pounds chicken thighs with skin and bones
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cups chopped white onions
  • 6 garlic cloves, peeled, crushed
  • 2 cups dry white wine
  • 1 teaspoon saffron threads, crushed
  • 2 cups (or more) low-salt chicken broth
  • 1 pound paccheri (giant rigatoni) or regular rigatoni
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons (or more) fresh lemon juice
  • 2/3 cup chopped fresh basil

Preparation

Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper. Heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add chicken, skin side down, to skillet and cook until golden, about 7 minutes per side. Transfer chicken to plate. Add onions and garlic to drippings in skillet; sauté until onions are slightly softened, 7 to 8 minutes. Add wine and saffron to skillet; bring to boil. Continue to boil until liquid is thickened and reduced by less than half, about 8 minutes. Add 2 cups chicken broth to skillet. Return chicken to skillet; bring to boil. Reduce heat to low. Cover; simmer gently until chicken is very tender (adjust heat to prevent boiling and turn chicken over after 30 minutes), about 1 hour total. Transfer chicken to plate and cool.

Reserve skillet with juices. Remove skin and bones from chicken and discard. Tear chicken meat into bite-size pieces; place in medium bowl and reserve.

Cook pasta in pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally. Drain; return to pot.

Meanwhile, spoon off fat from juices in skillet; discard fat. Add cream to juices in skillet and boil until sauce is reduced to 2 1/2 cups and is thick enough to coat spoon, about 10 minutes. Stir in 2 tablespoons lemon juice, then chicken pieces. Stir over medium heat until heated through, adding more broth by 1/4 cupfuls to thin sauce as needed and adding more lemon juice by teaspoonfuls, if desired, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add chicken mixture to pasta in pot and toss to coat. Stir in basil. Transfer pasta to plates.

Another Recommendation: If you like coq au vin, also try Zesty Braised Chicken with Lemon and Capers  Basil lovers, check out my top 9 recipes that use fresh herbs.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I develop in my test kitchen. My inspiration comes from cooking magazines (Bon Appétit, Fine Cooking, Food & Wine), cookbooks, blogs, online food communities such as Chowhound.com, popular restaurants, tv shows, friends, and family.

Now it’s your turn. Are you a saffron lover? What are your favorite ways to use it? We would love to hear from you if you enjoyed this recipe. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook

Braised Carrots and Potatoes

In side dish On September 18, 2010 8 Comments

Braised Potatoes and Carrots 009

Braised Carrots and Potatoes (recipe by “Vegetable Love,” Barbara Kafka)

Simplicity is definitely underrated. I’ve made these basic braised carrots and potatoes three times over the past month. They go great with this meatloaf on epicurious.com, which as of today has 188 mostly rave reviews.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 pound carrots, peeled, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 pound potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preparation

Place a rack in the bottom third of the oven. Preheat the oven to 500°F.

Toss the carrots and potatoes with the butter in a 12 x 10-inch roasting pan. Spread out in a single layer. Roast the vegetables for 30 minutes, stirring midway through cooking, until lightly browned.

Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F. Pour the stock into the roasting pan. Cover tightly with foil. Bake for 15 minutes. The liquid will be mostly absorbed by the vegetables. Season with the salt and pepper. Makes 3 1/2 cups.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook

Michael’s Stuffed Bell Peppers with Chicken Parmesan Filling

In poultry, seasonal, summer On September 17, 2010 22 Comments

Stuffed Bell Peppers with Chicken Parmesan Filling 022

Michael’s Stuffed Bell Peppers with Chicken Parmesan Filling (recipe by “Oishii!”)

Ground chicken, fresh basil, and parmesan star in the filling of these delicious stuffed peppers. My summer long quest to incorporate fresh farmers market produce in my cooking culminated in a recipe of my own. My recipe was inspired by some stuffed shell fillings in an amazing cookbook called “Vegetable Love” by Barbara Kafka. Try filling red, yellow-orange, and green bell peppers for a colorful and attractive dinner party dish.

Please share your best stuffed pepper recipes in the comments section below!

Ingredients

  • 6 green bell peppers, cut in half lengthwise, with stems, seeds, and ribs removed
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 3 large cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 pound ground chicken
  • 4 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1 cup bread crumbs
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1/3 cup basil, packed plus more for garnish
  • 1 cup grated parmesan cheese, plus more for garnish

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350°F. Arrange 12 bell pepper halves in a 9″ x 12″ baking dish cut side up. To make filling, mix together remaining ingredients in a large bowl. Divide filling equally among shells and stuff. Pour 1/4 cup water in baking dish to keep peppers moist. Bake in oven for about an hour. Replenish water during baking if necessary. Garnish with additional fresh basil and parmesan.

Other Ideas: Basil lovers, check out my top 9 recipes that use fresh herbs. Also try Stuffed Peppers with Feta and Pearled Couscous.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

Now it’s your turn. What do you put in your stuffed peppers? If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook