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Zucchini with Parmesan

In seasonal, side dish, summer, vegetarian On August 17, 2010 4 Comments

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Zucchini with Parmesan (recipe by Ina Garten, “Barefoot Contessa Family Style,” 2002)

I’m still on a mission for ways to use up the bounty of the harvest. Over the weekend I visited the farmers market specifically for a second round of zucchini. “Zucchini with Parmesan,” as well as many other Barefoot Contessa recipes, is so basic you’ll wish you would have thought of it. However, it does require a bit of time and patience because you can’t overcrowd the frying pan, or else the zucchini won’t brown properly. I ended up frying it in three separate batches. I recommend frying the onions alone so the zucchini has a chance to brown evenly. Pair this side with an easy main dish, or you’ll have too many things going on at once.

Photo note: I had great difficulty getting the natural lighting right for this photo, and after an hour of trying I almost gave up. I ended up taking it on my sidewalk in front of my cottage! Needless to say, the zucchini looked better when it was fresh out of the frying pan.

What are your favorite zucchini recipes? Please share your links. Here’s another one I enjoy: Lori’s Stuffed Zucchini.

Ingredients

  • 8 medium zucchini
  • Good olive oil
  • 2 large yellow onions cut in half and sliced 1/2 inch thick
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Preparation

Remove the ends of the zucchini and, if they are large, cut in half lengthwise. Slice the zucchini diagonally in 1/2-inch slices. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large (12-inch) saute pan and add the onions. Cook for 10 minutes on medium-low heat, until they start to brown. Add half the zucchini, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper to the pan and cook, tossing occasionally, for 10 to 15 minutes, until just cooked through. Sprinkle with Parmesan and cook for 30 seconds more. Remove to a serving platter and repeat with the rest of the zucchini. Serve immediately.

Note: If you cook too much zucchini in one pan, you end up steaming rather than sauteing it. I prefer to cook it in 2 batches.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Tuscan Lemon Chicken

In favorite, poultry On August 14, 2010 11 Comments

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Tuscan Lemon Chicken (recipe adapted from Ina Garten, “Barefoot Contessa Back to Basics,” 2008)

This lemon chicken is so succulent and delicious that I’ve made it twice in the last two weeks. My partner David said he “could eat it twice a week.” It’s versatile enough to serve many ways, and to that point I’ve made it with Guacamole Salad for a Mexican feel and Curried Couscous Salad for a more Middle Eastern take. Instead of grilling the chicken like Ina does, I leave the marinade in the pan and roast it in the oven until the skin is crispy. After plating the chicken I spoon the luscious sauce all over it.

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2-pounds bone-in chicken breasts with the skin on
  • kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
  • 1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary leaves
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 lemon, sliced

Preparation

Sprinkle salt on both sides of chicken.

Make the marinade: Whisk together the olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, garlic, rosemary, and pepper in a small bowl. Put the chicken in a sealed plastic storage bag with the marinade and refrigerate over night. Turn the chicken occasionally.

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Put the chicken and marinade in a 9 1/2″ x 13″ ceramic or glass baking dish. Roast chicken until the skin is golden brown, about 40 minutes. Spoon sauce over chicken and garnish with lemon slices.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

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Curried Couscous Salad

In Middle Eastern, salad, vegetarian On August 14, 2010 10 Comments

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Curried Couscous Salad (recipe adapted from Ina Garten, “The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook,” 1999)

This is a wonderful side dish which I paired with Ina Garten’s Tuscan Lemon Chicken for a light summer lunch. The couscous salad reminded us a little bit of stuffing, so it felt like a prelude to a Thanksgiving meal. With easy to find ingredients that are available all year long, it could be served anytime. It would be equally tasty if you substituted dried cranberries for the raisins.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups couscous
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup plain yogurt
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 cup small-diced carrots
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley (or substitute cilantro)
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup blanched, sliced almonds
  • 2 scallions, sliced (white and green parts)
  • 1/4 cup small-diced red onion
  • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper (to taste)

Preparation

Put the couscous in a medium-sized mixing bowl. Boil water in a large glass measuring cup in the microwave oven. Melt the butter in the hot water, and add the liquid to  the couscous. Cover with plastic wrap and let the couscous set for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork.

Make the dressing. Whisk together the yogurt, olive oil, white wine vinegar, curry, and turmeric. Mix the dressing into the couscous.  Toss in the carrots, parsley, raisins, almonds, scallions, and red onions. Season to taste with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper. Serve at room temperature.

Other Ideas:  Leftover parsley (or cilantro)? Check out my top 9 recipes that use fresh herbs.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Fresh Peach Iced Tea

In drinks, seasonal, vegetarian On August 11, 2010 3 Comments

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I used to love Snapple peach iced tea. Hoping to create my own peach flavored iced tea, I searched high and low for a recipe, and came across a few that use peach nectar. That was a good start. Then, I found this great idea from a blog called Of Cabbages & King Cakes for a simple syrup infused with fresh peaches. Now we’re talking! This a great way to make use of peaches when they are in season. The smooth taste of the tea is a revelation.

Fresh Peach Iced tea (recipe adapted from Of Cabbages & King Cakes)

Ingredients
makes about 2 cups of syrup

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 medium-sized peaches
  • Lipton tea, prepared according to package directions

Preparation

Peel and finely dice peaches. Put fruit and juices into a medium sized bowl.

Add sugar and water to a medium saucepan and stir. Bring to a boil for 30 seconds to a minute until liquid is clear.

Pour hot syrup over peaches in bowl, cover, and let steep for 30 minutes or more. Drain the syrup through a fine mesh strainer into a container. Discard peaches or save for another use. Chill syrup in the refrigerator.

Add 4 tablespoons syrup per cup of tea (or more or less to taste) and garnish with fresh peaches. Adapted from Of Cabbages & King Cakes.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

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Mary’s Baba Ghanoush with Toasted Pita Chips

In appetizer, Middle Eastern, snack, vegetarian On August 4, 2010 11 Comments

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Mary’s Baba Ghanoush with Toasted Pita Chips (recipe by “Oishii!”)

I’ve been waiting patiently for fresh eggplant at the farmers markets so I could make baba ghanoush, a tasty eggplant spread with a light smoky flavor. My friend Mary, who is from Iraq and has been cutting my hair for over 10 years at Klassy Cut (located in the Andersonville neighborhood in Chicago), taught me her method of making it. She noted that it is very similar to making hummus, but you use roasted eggplant instead of garbanzo beans. Once the eggplant comes out of the oven and is scooped out of the shell, it’s as easy to make as pulsing a food processor. Don’t let the strange name stop you from trying this great snack or appetizer.

Ingredient note: Tahini can be purchased at a natural food store such as Whole Foods or a specialty Middle Eastern grocery store.

Ingredients
baba ghanoush:

  • 2 eggplants, 1 lb. each, cut in half lengthwise
  • 2 large cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1/3 cup tahini
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, plus more to garnish
  • 1 tablespoon plain yogurt (optional)
  • kosher salt
  • optional garnishes: paprika, parsley, olives, cucumbers, or tomatoes

pita chips:

  • 5 small loaves of pita bread, or 7.5 ounces
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano

Preparation

baba ghanoush:

Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a heavy rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Sprinkle a little olive oil and kosher salt on eggplant halves and arrange it cut side down on the baking sheet. Roast in oven for 30 minutes or until eggplant is tender, and let it cool somewhat. Scoop out pulp and let it drain. Discard the skin.

Transfer to food processor the roasted eggplant, and add garlic, tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, yogurt (optional), and kosher salt. Pulse all ingredients. Put in serving bowl and drizzle extra olive oil on top. Add option garnishes if you wish. Serve with pita chips.

pita chips:

Preheat oven to 375 °F.  Line a heavy rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Tear by hand the double-layered pita into single layers of bread. Cut these half circles of pita into bite-sized triangular pieces. Spread out pita pieces onto baking pan sheet and sprinkle with olive oil, kosher salt, and dried oregano. Bake in oven 10 minutes or until toasted light brown.

Ideas

Serve with cucumber slices, carrot sticks, or pita chips for a healthy snack or appetizer. For a similar recipe, try Mary’s Hummus with Toasted Pita Chips. If you like tahini, Jersusalam Salad is nice too.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

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Guacamole Salad

In salad, side dish, vegetarian On July 31, 2010 10 Comments

Guacamole Salad

Guacamole Salad (recipe by Ina Garten, Barefoot Contessa at Home, 2006)

I’m entertaining friends this weekend in Galena and I was having difficulty coming up with a menu until I scoured my collection of Barefoot Contessa cookbooks. Ina Garten provided me with a treasure trove of easy ideas. I decided to pair her Tuscan Lemon Chicken with the guacamole salad. This deconstructed guacamole packed with extra veggies and black beans epitomizes the fresh flavors of summer. I was happy to incorporate in it fresh tomatoes and bell peppers from the farmers market as well as garlic from my own garden. Great colorful side!

Ingredients

  • 1 pint grape tomatoes, halved
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, seeded and 1/2-inch diced
  • 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 cup small diced red onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced jalapeno peppers, seeded (2 peppers)
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated lime zest
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice (2 limes)
  • 1/4 cup good olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 2 ripe Hass avocados, seeded, peeled, and 1/2-inch diced

Preparation

Place the tomatoes, yellow pepper, black beans, red onion, jalapeno peppers, and lime zest in a large bowl. Whisk together the lime juice, olive oil, salt, black pepper, garlic, and cayenne pepper and pour over the vegetables. Toss well.

Just before you’re ready to serve the salad, fold the avocados into the salad. Check the seasoning and serve at room temperature.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Tagliatelle With Fresh Corn Pesto

In pasta, summer On July 28, 2010 2 Comments

Tagliatelle With Fresh Corn Pesto

Tagliatelle With Fresh Corn Pesto (recipe by Bon Appétit, August 2010)

It’s not even August 1st and yet I’ve almost had my culinary fill of fresh corn for the season. My friend John noted that “you have to pace yourself.” Still, corn pesto sounded very enticing, and the recipe description said “the dish has a creamy richness that’s reminiscent of carbonara” but without the cream. John had also shared with us corn he had just purchased from a secret vendor in Cuba City, Wisconsin, so I had good reason to use up some of the best corn around.

My partner David loved the pasta dish, but for me the amount of pine nuts was overwelming. If you are in the mood for adventure, it is worth trying, but I doubt I would make this one twice.

Ingredients

  • 4 bacon slices, cut lengthwise in half, then crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 4 cups fresh corn kernels (cut from about 6 large ears)
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons coarse kosher salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese plus additional for serving
  • 1/3 cup pine nuts, toasted
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 8 ounces tagliatelle or fettuccine
  • 3/4 cup coarsely torn fresh basil leaves, divided

Preparation

Cook bacon in large nonstick skillet over medium heat until crisp and brown, stirring often. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Pour off all but 1 tablespoon drippings from skillet. Add corn, garlic, 1 1/4 teaspoons coarse salt, and 3/4 teaspoon pepper to drippings in skillet. Sauté over medium-high heat until corn is just tender but not brown, about 4 minutes. Transfer 1 1/2 cups corn kernels to small bowl and reserve. Scrape remaining corn mixture into processor. Add 1/2 cup Parmesan and pine nuts. With machine running, add olive oil through feed tube and blend until pesto is almost smooth. Set pesto aside.

Cook pasta in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally. Drain, reserving 1 1/2 cups pasta cooking liquid. Return pasta to pot. Add corn pesto, reserved corn kernels, and 1/2 cup basil leaves. Toss pasta mixture over medium heat until warmed through, adding reserved pasta cooking liquid by 1/4 cupfuls to thin to desired consistency, 2 to 3 minutes. Season pasta to taste with salt and pepper.

Transfer pasta to large shallow bowl. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4 cup basil leaves and reserved bacon. Serve pasta, passing additional grated Parmesan alongside.

Prep Tip

I recently learned an easy way to take corn off the cob from a Paula Deen “how to” video. Stand the corn cob up and put the tapered (or smaller) end into the hole of a bundt pan and slice the corn off. Most of it (but not all) will fall into the bundt pan. Be careful not to nick up your pan though.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Lori’s Stuffed Zucchini

In comfort food, seasonal, summer, vegetarian On July 24, 2010 11 Comments

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Stuffed Zucchini (recipe adapted from Murphy’s Gardens)

When my well of inspiration for recipes that use farmers market produce dried up, I turned to Lori Murphy, a friend and successful nursery owner in Galena, Illinois. Her business shifts gears from mid-summer and turns into a thriving farmstand well into the fall months. I was happy to try out a zucchini recipe for something not breaded or deep fried. I thought this comfort dish would be worth the extra effort, even though I’m usually not one to make stuffed things like mushrooms, deviled eggs, or twice baked potatoes. It contains a nice amount of fresh herbs too.

After I scooped the insides of the zucchini out and prepped the other veggies, I was wondering how a seemingly impossible amount of filling could fit into the scooped out zucchini shells. The answer is that it reduces considerably on the stove before filling. And the flavor comes together beautifully after the parmesan, egg, and cream cheese is added. Lori noted that you can add sliced tomatoes on top too. In her words, “It’s a little bit of work–but worth it. Delicious!” I agree. Try it! It’s good home cooking that your family will really enjoy.

Ingredients

  • 2-4 fresh zucchini, 6″-8” long
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 large green, red, or orange bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 cup fresh mushrooms, chopped
  • 1-2 garlic cloves, minced
  • reserved chopped zucchini (insides)
  • 3 ounces cream cheese
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese, plus additional for serving
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

Cut zucchini lengthwise down the middle. Scoop out insides of zucchini using a spoon or a melon baller, leaving about 1/2” of shell. Finely chop insides of zucchini and set it aside.

Sauté onion and pepper in olive oil. Add mushrooms, garlic, and reserved zucchini. Cook over medium heat until most of the moisture evaporates. Add cream cheese, egg, parmesan cheese, parsley, basil, and salt and pepper. Mix well and cook for another 10 minutes.

Cool filling slightly and then fill zucchini shells with mixture. Place in baking dish or on heavy rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper, and bake for approximately 30 minutes at 375° F until golden brown and bubbly.  Top with additional parmesan cheese. Adapted from Lori Murphy of Murphy’s Gardens.

Other Ideas:  Check out my top 9 recipes that use fresh herbs.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

Now it’s your turn. What are your favorite zucchini recipes? If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Please leave feedback in the comments section below. -Michael

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Jim ’N Nick’s Coleslaw

In favorite, salad, seasonal, side dish, summer, vegetarian On July 22, 2010 2 Comments

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Jim ’N Nick’s Coleslaw (recipe by Bon Appétit, August 2010, p. 14)

This recipe is from Jim N Nick’s Bar-B-Q in Charleston, South Carolina by request of Bon Appétit reader Nicole Comrey.  It appears in the popular “R.S.V.P./readers’ favorite restaurant recipes” column. I don’t know Jim and Nick, but I’ll bet they are going to make Bon Appétit fame with their coleslaw. It is perfection–flavorful and juicy with great texture. This should be the standard by which all coleslaws are measured. I served it with pulled pork sandwiches (see below).

I was wondering how it would turn out because the vinegar is drained from the cabbage after standing for only an hour. That might be their secret. I followed their do ahead method, waiting 8 hours before adding the mayo, carrot, and green onions. This will be a recipe I turn to over and over again.

Ingredients
8-10 servings

  • 1  2-pound head of green cabbage, quartered, cored, cut crosswise into 1/8 inch thick slices (about 14 cups)
  • 1¼ cups apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup grated peeled carrots
  • 4 green onions, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup mayonnaise

Preparation

Place cabbage in large bowl. Add vinegar and sugar; toss to coat. Cover and let stand 30 minutes. Toss cabbage mixture well; cover and let stand 30 minutes longer. Drain cabbage.  Do ahead: Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover and chill.

Transfer drained cabbage to another large bowl. Add carrots, green onions, and mayonnaise; toss to coat. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Adapted from Jim N Nick’s Bar-B-Q.

Ideas

Serve it with a fish fry or pulled pork sandwiches. Follow the Porchetta-Style Roast Pork recipe and make sandwiches on onion rolls with red onion.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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Top 9 Recipes That Use Fresh Herbs

In herbs, seasonal, summer, vegetarian On July 18, 2010 19 Comments

Top 9 Recipes That Use Fresh Herbs

updated: October 9, 2013

These are my favorite recipes for using large quantities of fresh herbs. I hope this list will inspire you to grab a whole bunch or two of basil or cilantro at the farmers market, or that it will offer an answer to anybody wondering what to do with large quantities of herbs. What are your favorite recipes that use lots of fresh herbs? I would love to hear from you!

1. Rib-eye Steaks With Chimichurri (oregano–1 cup, parsley or cilantro–1 cup)

2. Michael’s Pesto (basil–4 1/2 cups)

3. Salsa Verde (cilantro–1 cup)

4. Beef and Red Pepper Salad With Miso Dressing (cilantro–1 cup)

5. Michael’s Crazy Chicken Rice Noodle Stir-Fry (Thai basil–3/4 cup)

6. Farfalle With Sausage, Tomatoes, and Cream (basil–1/2 cup)

7. Corn and Tomato Salad With Cilantro Dressing (cilantro–1/4 cup)

8. Pasta With Shrimp and Cilantro-Lime Pesto (cilantro–1 1/2 cups)

9. Thai Curried Noodles With Pork and Basil (Thai basil–1/2 cup)

bonus:

Lori’s Stuffed Zucchini (parsley–1/2 cup, basil–2 tablespoons)

Jerusalam Salad (handful of parsley)

Rigatoni with Braised Chicken and Saffron Cream (basil–2/3 cup)

Bulgur, Garbanzo bean, and Cucumber Salad (dill–2/3 cup)

Michael’s Stuffed Bell Peppers with Chicken Parmesan Filling (basil–1/3 cup)

Kari’s Kick Ass Corn and Avocado Salsa (cilantro–1 cup)

Red Bell Pepper and Sautéed Corn Salad with Cilantro Dressing (cilantro–1/4 cup)

Stuffed Peppers with Feta and Pearled Couscous (cilantro–1/3 cup)

Curried Couscous Salad (parsley or cilantro–1/2 cup)

Spaghetti and Meatballs (parsley–3/4 cup)

Roasted Butternut Penne with Pistachio Pesto (1 cup of mixed herbs, I like a mixture of cilantro and chives)

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook