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Szechuan Beef and Green Beans

In asian, Chinese, favorite On March 17, 2011 10 Comments

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Szechuan Beef and Green Beans (recipe adapted from “Mcnuttle” on grouprecipes.com )

I’ve been researching szechuan beef recipes for awhile now, and I keep coming back to this one that I adapted from grouprecipes.com. I found some valuable references along the way too. If you are interested in Szechuan cooking check out Fuchsia Dunlop’s “Land of Plenty.” For a more general Chinese cookbook try “Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen” by Grace Young.

If you’ve never had szechuan peppercorns before, they are worth trying. (I buy mine from Penzey’s.) Some szechuan recipes that call for the peppercorns actually have “numbing” in the title, but I don’t think they are overbearing at all. They provide some heat and a pleasant tingling sensation to the tongue. To prepare the peppercorns for this recipe, fry them in a dry pan over medium-high heat until fragrant, then grind in a mortar and pestle.

Ingredients

marinade

  • 2 1/2 tablespoons dark soy sauce, divided
  • 5 tablespoons Chinese rice wine (Shaoxing), divided
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon bean sauce (I use Healthy Boy brand soy bean paste)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sriracha chili paste
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch

other

  • 1 1/2 pounds flank steak (or rib-eye), cut into thin 1″ slices
  • 3 tablespoons peanut oil, divided
  • 5 dried red Chinese chilies, broken in half
  • 1 orange or green bell pepper, chopped into 1/2″dice
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 pound green beans, ends trimmed off
  • 3 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and minced
  • 1 teaspoon szechuan peppercorns (toasted and ground)
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • sesame oil (to taste)

Preparation

Make the marinade. In a medium bowl combine  1 1/2 teaspoons dark soy sauce, 3 tablespoons Chinese rice wine, bean sauce, sriracha chili paste, and cornstarch.  Mix in the flank steak and marinate for 30 minutes or more.

Heat a large wok (or non-stick frying pan) over high heat until almost smoking. Swirl in one tablespoon of the peanut oil, and add dried red chiles. When they are darkened, add the bell pepper. Cook until slightly softened. Remove from heat and set aside in a small bowl.

Heat another tablespoon of peanut oil in wok. Add the onions and brown. Remove from heat and set aside in a small bowl.

In a large mixing bowl toss green beans with one tablespoon of dark soy sauce. Add to wok and cook until softened. Remove from heat and return beans to the mixing bowl and set aside.

Divide the marinated beef among two small bowls. Heat 1/2 tablespoon peanut oil in wok. Add the first batch of meat into a single layer in the pan and leave it undisturbed until the bottom browns. Then continue stir frying until cooked through. Remove from heat and set aside in a bowl. Wipe the wok clean for the second batch. Heat final 1/2 tablespoon oil in wok. Spread out remaining beef into a single layer in the wok and leave it undisturbed until the bottom browns. Mix in the garlic, ginger, and szechuan peppercorns, and continue stir frying until cooked through. Stir the first batch of beef back into the pan.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce and 2 tablespoons rice wine. Return to the wok the bell peppers, chilies, onions, green beans, and beef. Add the chicken broth and heat until cooked through.

Drizzle with sesame oil to taste. Serve with steamed white rice.

Other Chinese favorites

Mongolian Beef
Shrimp in Lobster Sauce
Kung Pao Chicken

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Please leave some feedback in the comments section below. -Michael

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Kung Pao Chicken

In asian, Chinese On January 16, 2011 12 Comments

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Kung Pao Chicken (recipe adapted from Tigers & Strawberries blog by Barbara Fisher)

Happy New Year! “Oishii!” has been on vacation as we prepare to move our household from Chicago to Oak Park, Illinois.

I’ve discovered that good recipes for standard Chinese takeout fare are rather hard to come by. However, I hit the jackpot with this well researched, authentic version of kung pao chicken by Barbara Fisher. It has quickly become a family favorite. Hint: This recipe easily doubles; many of the ingredients are called for in amounts of 1 1/2 teaspoons which doubles easily to 1 tablespoon. Fry in two separate batches.

Ingredients
sauce:

  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dark soy sauce (e.g. Wei-Chuan China Dark)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons light soy sauce (e.g. Wei-Chuan China Light)
  • 4 1/2 teaspoons black rice vinegar (e.g. Chinkiang brand)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons hoisin sauce
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons chicken broth

marinade:

  • 2 teaspoons light soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Chinese cooking wine (e.g. Shao Hsing brand)
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch

other ingredients:

  • 2 boneless, boneless skinless chicken breasts cut into 1/2″ cubes (about 1 pound)
  • 2 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 6 whole dried Chinese red peppers (or to taste)
  • 4 cloves of garlic (about 1 1/2 tablespoons), minced
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh ginger, minced
  • 3/4 large jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced
  • 1 cup carrots, sliced
  • 4 scallions, sliced
  • 1/2 cup dry roasted unsalted peanuts, chopped

Preparation

Make the sauce. Combine first 8 ingredients in a small bowl and set aside.

Make the marinade. Mix together the light soy sauce, Chinese cooking wine, and cornstarch in a medium sized mixing bowl. Add the chicken and set aside.

Heat a wok or large non-stick frying pan over high heat until it is nearly smoking, and then add peanut oil. Add dried Chinese red peppers and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add chicken into a single layer on the bottom of the pan, and allow it to brown undisturbed. Add garlic, ginger, and jalapenos, and continue cooking. Add carrots, and when chicken is nearly done, pour in the sauce. When the sauce thickens add scallions, stir, and remove from heat. Add peanuts just before serving. Don’t eat the dried Chinese red peppers.

Serving Suggestion: Serve with steamed broccoli and white rice. I recommend Botan and Kokuho Rose brands.

Other Chinese favorites

Mongolian Beef
Shrimp in Lobster Sauce
Szechuan Beef and Green Beans

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

Do you have any great recipes for Chinese takeout food? Leave a link. If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you. Please leave a comment below. -Michael

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Raisin, Walnut, and Pecan Bread

In bread, breakfast, vegetarian On December 17, 2010 8 Comments

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Raisin, Walnut, and Pecan Bread (adapted from Bon Appétit, April 2010)

Baking bread can be so rewarding, especially when the loaves come out of the oven looking as gorgeous as these. They made me feel like a professional baker, which I am not! The recipe appeared in Bon Appétit’s R.S.V.P./readers’ favorite restaurant recipes column back in April and is from Del Vecchio’s Bakery in Fenwick Island, DE.

Serve it warm with butter and cinnamon-sugar sprinkled on top. It would be a wonderful addition to a brunch. Great comfort food! Also try it with dried cherries or blueberries.

Ingredients
makes two loaves

  • 2 cups warm water (100°F-110°F)
  • 3  1/4-ounce envelopes active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 5 1/2 cups (or more) bread flour
  • 2 cups raisins or other dried fruit
  • 1/2 cup chopped pecans
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup (packed) golden brown sugar

Preparation

Add 2 cups of water to a large glass measuring cup. Heat water in microwave to 100° – 110°F (lukewarm). Stir yeast into water until smooth.  In a large bowl of an electric mixer, combine yeast-water with oil, sugar, and salt. Mix in the flour.  If dough is sticky, add more flour until it is soft. Use the dough hook on the electric mixer and knead for 8 minutes. Add dried fruit, nuts, and brown sugar, and mix. Oil another large bowl. Place dough in bowl and turn to coat. Cover with plastic wrap and chill overnight in the refrigerator.

Line a heavy-rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Divide dough into two equal pieces. Form each one into a round.  Space rounds apart on baking sheet. Cover with a kitchen towel and let rise about 2 hours until doubled.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Bake bread until golden brown and bread sounds hollow when tapped, about 45 minutes. Adapted from Del Vecchio’s Bakery.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

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Michael’s Peanut Butter Granola with Honey, Dates and Raisins

In breakfast, snack, vegetarian On December 12, 2010 6 Comments

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Michael’s Peanut Butter Granola with Honey, Dates and Raisins (recipe by “Oishii!”)

I love peanut butter! As a kid I used to like Cap’n Crunch’s peanut butter cereal, even though it quickly got soggy and produced putrid peanut butter milk in the cereal bowl.  Anyway, that was my inspiration for creating an adult peanut butter cereal, which is the latest in my granola recipe series.  I think the dates in it have a natural affinity for the peanut butter. I also added a 1/2 cup of flaxseed, which is high in omega 3 fatty acids. Note that you must grind the flaxseed to get the health benefits out of it. If you opt out of the flaxseed, just add an additional 1/2 cup of rolled oats or another dry ingredient.

Serve granola over vanilla yogurt.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups smooth peanut butter
  • 1 1/2 cups honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 4 large egg whites
  • 1/2 cup whole grain flaxseed
  • 7 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup oat bran
  • 1 cup roasted cashews, chopped
  • 1/2 cup dates, chopped
  • 1/2 cup raisins

Preparation

Preheat oven to 250°F. Grease a heavy rimmed baking sheet with butter.

Stir peanut butter and honey in a medium heavy saucepan over low heat until peanut butter melts. Pour into extra large mixing bowl. Cool a bit and mix in vanilla, cinnamon, and egg whites.

In a food processer, whirl the flaxseed.  Add flaxseed, rolled oats, and oat bran to the peanut butter mixture. Stir with a thick wooden spoon.

Spread granola in an even layer on prepared baking sheet with a rubber spatula. Bake 1 hour 30 minutes, turning granola over every 15 minutes with a wide metal spatula. Mix in cashews, dates, and raisins after baking 45 minutes. When granola is light golden brown take out of oven. Leave on baking sheet, place on top of wire rack, and let cool. Store in airtight container or freezer bags.

Ideas: Also try my honey-pear granola with pistachios and maple-pecan granola with dried cherries and blueberries.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

Now it’s your turn. What kinds of granola do you make? We would love to hear from you if you enjoyed this recipe. -Michael

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Farfalle with Sausage, Tomatoes, and Cream

In comfort food, favorite, Italian On December 11, 2010 8 Comments

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Farfalle with Sausage, Tomatoes, and Cream (recipe adapted from Bon Appétit)

“Farfalle with Sausage, Tomatoes, and Cream” is a quick and easy perennial favorite of mine. I’ve been making this pasta dish for years. The recipe calls for plenty of fresh basil, a key ingredient, and just the right amount of crushed red pepper to give it a little heat. The flavors are clean and it’s simplicity at its best. The whole family will love it.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 pound sweet Italian sausage
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes with added puree
  • 1/2 cup half and half
  • 1 pound farfalle (bow-tie pasta)
  • 1/2 cup (packed) chopped fresh basil
  • Grated Pecorino Romano cheese

Preparation

Cook pasta in large pot of boiling salted water until tender but still firm to bite. Drain, reserving 1 cup cooking liquid. Return pasta to same pot.

Meanwhile, make the sauce. Heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add sausage and crushed red pepper. Break up meat with wooden spoon. Sauté until sausage is no longer pink. Add onion and garlic; sauté until onion is tender and sausage is browned. Add tomatoes and half and half. Reduce heat to low and simmer until sausage mixture thickens. Season to taste with kosher salt and pepper.

Toss some pasta with the sauce until well coated. Add some reserved cooking liquid if mixture is dry. Transfer pasta to serving dish. Sprinkle with basil and romano cheese.

Ideas: Basil lovers, also check out my top 9 recipes that use fresh herbs.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

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Perfect Pepperoni Pizza

In favorite, Italian On December 4, 2010 4 Comments

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Perfect Pepperoni Pizza (recipe by “Oishii”)

I’m passionate about pizza. I appreciate all of the differences in the crust, sauce, cheese, and toppings that each pizza maker brings to the table. It seems like an infinite combination of possibilities, and it’s no wonder everybody has a favorite pizza.

I’ve been making my own homemade pizza for many years now, and I serve it with the utmost confidence to my friends and family. It has never failed me! The crust is slightly crunchy with a unique buttery taste. The sauce, made with canned crushed tomatoes, oregano, and crushed red pepper, is a simple yet authentic version used by any pizzaiola throughout Italy.  I prefer to use fresh mozzarella, which results in a silky texture and delicious flavor.

I have been meaning to share this recipe for some time. I hope you like it as much as I do. I’m not going to lie. This is a great pizza! The recipe makes enough for two 13″ pizzas.

Ingredients

Sauce
makes about 3 cups

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 3 large cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • kosher salt to taste

Dough
makes enough for two 13″ pizzas

  • 1 1/3 cups water
  • 2 packets (4 1/2 teaspoons) of active dry yeast
  • 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • dash kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

Toppings

  • 1 pound fresh mozzarella, thinly sliced
  • 8 ounces thick sliced pepperoni
  • 2 small onions, diced

Preparation

Make the sauce: Heat oil in a frying pan on medium. Add crushed red pepper and garlic and stir.  Fry until garlic starts to brown, about a half minute, then quickly add canned tomatoes and oregano. Cook sauce until it thickens. Add kosher salt to taste. Cool before using. Can be made several days in advance and stored in the refrigerator.

Make the dough: Add 1 1/3 cups of water to a large glass measuring cup. Heat water in microwave to 100° – 110°F (lukewarm). Stir yeast into water until smooth. Combine flour, salt, and olive oil in a large bowl of an electric mixer.  Add yeast-water to the flour mixture and mix until just combined. Add a little flour if the dough is too sticky. Use the dough hook on the electric mixer and knead dough for 10 minutes. Alternatively, flour a work surface and knead the dough by hand until pliable.

Form the dough into a ball. Grease a large bowl with olive oil, and put the ball of dough in it. Turn the dough until it is lightly coated with oil. Cover loosely with a kitchen towel (flour sack towels work great), set in a warm place, and let it rise for 30-45 minutes. The dough will double in size.

Make the pizzas: Preheat oven to 425°F. Punch down dough and form into two balls. Lightly flour two baking stones and roll out each ball of dough directly on them. Spread 1/2 cup or more pizza sauce onto each pizza, and top with cheese, pepperoni, and onion. Bake in oven for 25 minutes or until golden brown.

Pizza Making References

“Basic Italian: Everything you need to live the dolce vita at home,” by Cornelia Schinharl, Sebastian Dickhaut, and Kelsey Lane
“Pizza: Any Way You Slice It,” by Charles and Michele Scicolone

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

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Great Northern Bean and Chorizo Soup

In soup On December 3, 2010 6 Comments

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Great Northern Bean and Chorizo Soup (recipe adapted from “The Daily Soup Cookbook,” by Leslie Kaul, Bob Spiegel, Carla Ruben, and Peter Siegel with Robin Vitetta-Miller)

As I was cleaning up from our modest Thanksgiving feast, I made some turkey stock that I ended up putting into this savory white bean and chorizo soup. Not only was our 8-lb turkey breast enough for dinner for four and plenty of leftovers for everyone for days, but it produced a whole six cups of stock, which made for a very flavorful pot of soup.

updated: 2/14/15: I have made this bean soup many times with or without the vermouth. I find that the vermouth adds an interesting flavor dimension, but then I’m left with a bottle of liquor that goes unused. What has taken this soup to new flavor heights is using homemade chorizo, which is quite easy to make. I follow the recipe from the Homesick Texan.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound chorizo
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 pound bacon, cut into small pieces
  • 1 large Spanish onion, chopped
  • 3 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced (divided)
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 pound Great Northern beans, rinsed
  • 2 medium potatoes, cut into 1″ pieces
  • 6 cups chicken (or turkey) stock
  • 1/4 cup dry vermouth (optional)
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt

Preparation

Add the chorizo and water to a large stockpot over medium heat. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and poach for 10 minutes. Remove the chorizo with a slotted spoon, and reserve 2 cups of poaching liquid. Discard rest of water. When chorizo has cooled, chop into small pieces.

Heat the oil in a large stockpot over medium heat. Add the bacon and fry until golden brown. Add the onion, carrots, and 2 garlic cloves and cook until tender. Add the thyme, paprika, bay leaves, and pepper and stir to coat the vegetables. Add the reserved poaching liquid, beans, potatoes, and stock and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, partially cover, and simmer for 1-2 hours, until the beans are tender. Stir in the chorizo and simmer for two minutes. Remove from heat and stir in the vermouth, salt, and remaining garlic clove. Remove the bay leaves and serve.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I develop in my test kitchen. My inspiration comes from cooking magazines (Bon Appétit, Fine Cooking, Food & Wine), cookbooks, blogs, online food communities such as Chowhound.com, popular restaurants, tv shows, friends, and family.

Now it’s your turn. Do you have any delicious northern bean soup recipes? We would love to hear from you if you enjoyed this recipe. -Michael

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Lori’s Rhubarb Bread

In breakfast, desserts, snack, spring, vegetarian On November 17, 2010 6 Comments

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Lori’s Rhubarb Bread (recipe adapted from Lori Murphy)

I come from a family of rhubarb lovers. One of my favorites is strawberry-rhubarb pie. Rhubarb is not in season now, but I still wanted to share this recipe for future reference. I had some rhubarb to use up in my freezer and it went to a good cause!

This gem comes from my friend Lori of Murphy’s Gardens, my favorite nursery in Galena, Illinois. The rhubarb bread comes out incredibly moist and has a crunchy cinnamon-sugar crust on top. The recipe makes a generous two loaves.

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 1/2 cups rhubarb, chopped into small pieces
  • 1/2 cup pecans or walnuts, chopped
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 or 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease with butter and flour two small loaf pans.

In a medium bowl whisk together the flour, baking soda, and salt.

In the bowl of an electric mixer cream together the brown sugar and oil. Add the buttermilk, egg, and vanilla. Mix in the  dry ingredients, rhubarb, and nuts.

In a small bowl mix together the sugar and cinnamon. Divide batter among loaf pans. Sprinkle cinnamon sugar on top of breads and dot with butter.

Bake in oven for 45-55 minutes. Breads will be finished when an inserted toothpick comes out clean.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

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Gyudon (Beef Bowl)

In asian, Japanese On November 13, 2010 18 Comments

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Gyudon (Beef Bowl) (recipe adapted from Cooking with Dog)

Gyudon, which is simmered beef and onions served over a bowl of white rice, is a Japanese fast food original. When I lived in Tokyo, like countless other “salarymen,” I sometimes ate it on the way home from work or after a night of drinking. I don’t why, but there seem to be many foods that appeal more to Japanese men than women, and gyudon is definitely one of them.  Ramen noodles would be another example.

I was looking for an authentic recipe and thankfully Chowhound.com member “BigSal” recommended a video series on YouTube called Cooking with Dog, which is hosted by an adorable toy poodle named Francis nonetheless. I’ll bet that the series was developed specifically for a Japanese audience eager to learn English. While it is rather comical to watch from a “western” perspective, the precision in the recipes is admirable, and I’m guessing there are many Japanese housewives interested in cooking who take it rather seriously as an English learning tool.

Note about the optional garnishes: I dislike beni shoga (Japanese pickled ginger), but I wouldn’t even consider not using shichimi togarashi (Japanese seven spice). I guess everyone has a preference. The original recipe called for soft boiled eggs, which I did not include.

Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons sake
  • 2 tablespoons hon-mirin or aji-mirin (e.g. Kikkoman brand)
  • 4 tablespoons soy sauce (e.g. Kikkoman brand)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 pound rib-eye steak or beef tenderloin, sliced as thinly as possible into 3″ long pieces
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon hon-dashi or dashi-no-moto (bonito fish soup stock, e.g. Shimaya brand)
  • 2 teaspoons fresh ginger, grated (a Microplane works great for this)
  • 1 medium onion (8 ounces), cut into 1/2″ wedges through the root and separated into layers
  • cooked Japanese rice (e.g. Kokuho Rose, Botan, or Nishiki brands)
  • scallions, sliced – optional
  • shichimi togarashi or nanami togarashi (Japanese seven spice, e.g. S&B brand) – optional
  • beni shoga (Japanese picked ginger) – optional

Preparation

In a small bowl combine the sake, hon-mirin or aji-mirin, soy sauce, and sugar.

Fill a medium-sized saucepan 2/3 full of water and bring to a boil. Parboil the beef just until the color is no longer red. Remove it with a slotted spoon and put it in a small bowl. Discard the water.

Heat a 12″ frying pan (one with a lid but uncovered initially) over medium heat and add sauce. When it starts to boil add the beef and coat well with sauce. Remove beef from pan and set aside.  To the sauce add 3/4 cup water, hon-dashi or dashi-no-moto, ginger, and onions. Stir and bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to low. Simmer for 5 minutes. Remove the lid and add the beef. Stir well.

Ladle the simmered beef and onions along with some liquid over bowls of steamed rice. Sprinkle with choice of optional garnishes if desired: scallions, shichimi togarashi, and beni shoga.

Prep note: Have your butcher thinly slice the beef for you, or if that is not possible, put it in the freezer for an hour and slice it yourself.

Donburi

Try These Other Japanese Favorites
Omuraisu (Japanese-Style Omelet Stuffed with Chicken and Rice)
Pork Yakisoba

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

Now it’s your turn. What are your favorite Japanese fast foods? Do you have any interesting uses for shichimi togarashi? If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! -Michael

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Seared Asian Steak and Mushrooms on Mixed Greens with Ginger Dressing

In asian, salad On October 28, 2010 4 Comments

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Seared Asian Steak and Mushrooms on Mixed Greens with Ginger Dressing (recipe by Bon Appétit, November 2010)

Here’s a mouth watering dinner salad that is fun to make too. Rib-eye steak and baby bella mushrooms are a delectable combination, and the ginger in the asian dressing gives it a nice punch of flavor. I added a cup of cilantro to the lettuce greens and it tasted great. The dressing would also be perfect on a cucumber salad or as a marinade.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
  • 4 1/2 teaspoons vegetable oil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon Asian chili-garlic sauce
  • 1/8 teaspoon plus 2 teaspoons Asian sesame oil, divided
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 12-ounce rib-eye steaks
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds
  • 8 ounces crimini (baby bella) mushrooms, quartered
  • 8 cups mixed greens

Preparation

Mix soy sauce, rice vinegar, 1 1/2 teaspoons vegetable oil, minced ginger, chili-garlic sauce, and 1/8 teaspoon sesame oil in small bowl. Add cilantro and stir to blend. Set dressing aside.

Rub 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil over each side of each rib-eye steak. Sprinkle steaks with salt, pepper, and toasted sesame seeds; press firmly to adhere. Heat 2 teaspoons vegetable oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms; sauté until browned, about 8 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer sautéed mushrooms to plate. Add 1 teaspoon vegetable oil and 1 teaspoon sesame oil to skillet; heat over medium-high heat. Add steaks; cook to desired doneness, 3 to 4 minutes per side for medium-rare. Transfer steaks to cutting board. Slice steaks. Toss mixed greens with dressing in large bowl; divide greens among plates. Top with steak slices and mushrooms and serve.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to consider: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

Now it’s your turn. If you enjoyed this post, we would love to hear from you! Your feedback in the comments section below is essential to the success of this blog. -Michael

Join “Oishii!” on Facebook