Parmesan With Zucchini.3 020

Zucchini with Parmesan (recipe by Ina Garten, “Barefoot Contessa Family Style,” 2002)

I’m still on a mission for ways to use up the bounty of the harvest. Over the weekend I visited the farmers market specifically for a second round of zucchini. “Zucchini with Parmesan,” as well as many other Barefoot Contessa recipes, is so basic you’ll wish you would have thought of it. However, it does require a bit of time and patience because you can’t overcrowd the frying pan, or else the zucchini won’t brown properly. I ended up frying it in three separate batches. I recommend frying the onions alone so the zucchini has a chance to brown evenly. Pair this side with an easy main dish, or you’ll have too many things going on at once.

Photo note: I had great difficulty getting the natural lighting right for this photo, and after an hour of trying I almost gave up. I ended up taking it on my sidewalk in front of my cottage! Needless to say, the zucchini looked better when it was fresh out of the frying pan.

What are your favorite zucchini recipes? Please share your links. Here’s another one I enjoy: Lori’s Stuffed Zucchini.

Ingredients

  • 8 medium zucchini
  • Good olive oil
  • 2 large yellow onions cut in half and sliced 1/2 inch thick
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Preparation

Remove the ends of the zucchini and, if they are large, cut in half lengthwise. Slice the zucchini diagonally in 1/2-inch slices. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large (12-inch) saute pan and add the onions. Cook for 10 minutes on medium-low heat, until they start to brown. Add half the zucchini, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper to the pan and cook, tossing occasionally, for 10 to 15 minutes, until just cooked through. Sprinkle with Parmesan and cook for 30 seconds more. Remove to a serving platter and repeat with the rest of the zucchini. Serve immediately.

Note: If you cook too much zucchini in one pan, you end up steaming rather than sauteing it. I prefer to cook it in 2 batches.

What’s oishii? “Oishii” (pronounced “oy she”) is the Japanese word for delicious. I love sharing great recipes I discover from popular restaurants, cookbooks, food magazines (Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, etc.), tv shows, friends, family, and other blogs. I also develop my own. Please contact me if there is a recipe you would like the test kitchen to review: michaelwbeyer@hotmail.com

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